2016
 

Oxidative Stability and Shelf Life of Food Emulsions

År: 2016

Oxidative Stability and Shelf Life of Food Emulsions

Jacobsen, C. 2016 Oxidative Stability and Shelf Life of Foods Containing Oils and Fats. AOCS American Oil Chemists' Society, Ch. 8, p. 287-312 26 p.

Publication: Research - peer-reviewBook chapter – Annual report year: 2016

Lipid oxidation and antioxidant effects in food emulsions are influenced by many different factors, such as the composition of the aqueous phase and interface, the partitioning of the antioxidants between the different phases of the emulsion system, the antioxidant properties, and others. This chapter will give an overview of the most important factors influencing lipid oxidation in such systems. This will be followed by a summary of the effects of some of these factors including antioxidant addition in real food emulsions such as mayonnaise, dressing, dairy products, margarine, and spreads.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationOxidative Stability and Shelf Life of Foods Containing Oils and Fats
Number of pages26
PublisherAOCS American Oil Chemists' Society
Publication date2016
Pages287-312
Chapter8
ISBN (print)9781630670566
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

 

Impact and distribution of bottom trawl fishing on mud-bottom communities in the Kattegat

År: 2016

Impact and distribution of bottom trawl fishing on mud-bottom communities in the Kattegat

Pommer, C. D., Olesen, M. & Hansen, J. L. S. 2016 In : Marine Ecology Progress Series. 548, p. 47-60

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2016

The Kattegat in the inner Danish waters has been trawled for at least 80 yr, but so far only few attempts have been made to quantify the trawl effort, its spatial distribution and its potential ecological impact on the benthic fauna. GIS-analyses of VMS-data from trawling in the Kattegat by both Danish (2005-2009) and Swedish (2007-2009) vessels show that 95% of all trawling occurs below 22 m depth. Most activity takes place on homogeneous benthic habitats with muddy sediment at depths below the halocline and with almost the same salinity across the entire area. Furthermore, the estimate of trawled area demonstrated that the habitats are nearly 100% impacted, and frequencies of trawling beneath 100 m depth can reach 20 events per year. Multivariate analysis of community composition could not discriminate between lightly trawled and heavily trawled areas. However, a strong habitat selectivity of the trawl activity and inter-correlation between trawl activity and depth-related community structures complicated interpretation of the results. Species with biological traits previously categorized as sensitive to physical disturbance showed higher abundance in areas with low trawl activity compared to areas with higher activity. Thus, the Kattegat has been impacted to an extent where areas with reference conditions for certain habitats below 22 m no longer exist. Consequently, it is unknown how the benthic communities would have appeared without trawl disturbance and, thus, difficult to determine the impact of continued disturbance.
Original languageEnglish
Book seriesMarine Ecology Progress Series
Volume548
Pages (from-to)47-60
ISSN1616-1599
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

 

Overview of coralline red algal crusts and rhodolith beds (Corallinales, Rhodophyta) and their possible ecological importance in Greenland

År: 2016

Overview of coralline red algal crusts and rhodolith beds (Corallinales, Rhodophyta) and their possible ecological importance in Greenland

Jørgensbye, H. I. Ø. & Halfar, J. 2016 In : Polar Biology. p. 1-15

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2016

Coralline red algae are a globally distributed and abundant group of shallow marine benthic calcifiers. They can form important ecosystems that provide a three-dimensional habitat to a large variety of marine organisms. While the study of coralline red algae has traditionally been focused on warm-water habitats, numerous recent reports have now described widespread coralline red algal ecosystems from high-latitude regions, particularly in the Northern Hemisphere. In fact, it is becoming increasingly evident that coralline red algae are likely the dominant marine calcifying organisms on the seafloor of the Arctic and subarctic photic zone. This article gives a first overview of the distribution of coralline red algal crusts and rhodolith (free-living coralline red algal nodules) grounds in Greenland and the first report of rhodoliths in East Greenland. Museum data and recent sampling information have been compiled to develop a distribution map of coralline genera and rhodolith communities. The depth range of coralline red algae in Greenland has been extended by 27 m, from 50 to 77 m depth. In addition, rhodoliths of the normally crust-forming species Clathromorphum compactum are described for the first time from a sheltered Greenland fjord. Based on the data compiled here, it becomes clear that rhodolith communities are a widespread feature of the Greenland shallow shelf areas. Gaining a better understanding of the distribution of these hitherto poorly understood high-latitude ecosystems is essential due to their function as spawning areas and nursery grounds for commercially important fish and invertebrates.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPolar Biology
Pages (from-to)1-15
ISSN0722-4060
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - 2016

 

Photoregulation in a Kleptochloroplastidic Dinoflagellate, Dinophysis acuta

År: 2016

Photoregulation in a Kleptochloroplastidic Dinoflagellate, Dinophysis acuta

Hansen, P. J., Ojamae, K., Berge, T., Trampe, E. C. L., Nielsen, L. T., Lips, I. & Kühl, M. 2016 In : Frontiers in Microbiology. 7, p. 1-11 785

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2016

Some phagotrophic organisms can retain chloroplasts of their photosynthetic prey as so-called kleptochloroplasts and maintain their function for shorter or longer periods of time. Here we show for the first time that the dinoflagellate Dinophysis acute takes control over "third-hand" chloroplasts obtained from its ciliate prey Mesodinium spp. that originally ingested the cryptophyte chloroplasts. With its kleptochloroplasts, D. acuta can synthesize photosynthetic as well as photoprotective pigments under long-term starvation in the light. Variable chlorophyll fluorescence measurements showed that the kleptochloroplasts were fully functional during 1 month of prey starvation, while the chlorophyll a-specific inorganic carbon uptake decreased within days of prey starvation under an irradiance of 100 mu mol photons m(-2) s(-1). While a acute cells can regulate their pigmentation and function of kleptochloroplasts they apparently lose the ability to maintain high inorganic carbon fixation rates.
Original languageEnglish
Article number785
JournalFrontiers in Microbiology
Volume7
Pages (from-to)1-11
ISSN1664-302X
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

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Magnitude, spatial scale and optimization of ecosystem services from a nutrient extraction mussel farm in the eutrophic Skive Fjord, Denmark

År: 2016

Magnitude, spatial scale and optimization of ecosystem services from a nutrient extraction mussel farm in the eutrophic Skive Fjord, Denmark

Nielsen, P., Cranford, P. J., Maar, M. & Petersen, J. K. 2016 In : Aquaculture Environment Interactions. 8, p. 311-329

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2016

Suspended mussel aquaculture has been proposed as a possible mechanism by which to remove excess nutrients from eutrophic marine areas. In this study, seasonal mussel growth and water clarification (through seston and phytoplankton depletion) were studied at a commercial-scale nutrient extractive mussel farm in a highly eu - trophic Danish fjord. Spatial variations in mussel biomass were examined throughout the year and no significant differences were detected within the farm. Food depletion by mussels was examined at spatial scales ranging from individuals to the entire farm and surrounding area. Phytoplankton depletion on the scale of individual mussel loops, determined using the siphon mimic approach, indicated between 27 and 44% depletion of chlorophyll a (chl a). Farm-scale depletion was detected and visualized based on intensive 3D spatial surveys of the distribution of chl a and total suspended particulate matter concentrations both inside and outside the farmed area. Average reductions in food supply within the farm ranged from 13 to 31%, with some areas showing >50% food depletion. A food depletion model was developed to estimate the optimal mussel density required to maximize removal of excess phytoplankton. The model employed mussel clearance rate estimates derived from the observed magnitude of food depletion within the farm. Model results indicate that the mussel population filtration rate could be increased by 80 to 120% without any negative feedback on mussel growth. This could be accomplished by approximately doubling the standing stock of mussels in the farm, hence doubling the amount if nutrients removed at mussel harvest
Original languageEnglish
JournalAquaculture Environment Interactions
Volume8
Pages (from-to)311-329
ISSN1869-215X
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016